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Elementary: Week 2, Day 3

Prompt

Blue boxes denote content to read directly to students. Read the following:

We’re going to continue with feeling relaxed. Instead of focusing on our bodies, though, we’re going to talk about how talking can relieve stress.  We’re going to imagine two different scenarios.  While you’re doing your imagining, you could look down at your desk or you can close your eyes. 

Imagine that you had a disagreement with someone. Not a big huge ugly fight!  Just a disagreement. And imagine that you had the courage at that moment to talk about it with this other person. The other person listened, and then you had a conversation, and when it was over, you both felt better.  Take a deep breath and relax your body. Let yourself feel how it helped to talk about it instead of holding it in.

Now we’re going to do the opposite.  imagine that something happens with someone and you don’t feel like you can bring it up.  You decide not to tell them you’re upset.  Really let yourself imagine this, and now, scan your body to see how it feels different than a few moments ago.  Where do you hold the stress of being unhappy about something but not feeling like you can bring it up?  Take a moment and breathe into that place to help it relax.  Each time you exhale, let yourself relax.

OK let’s go back again and remember the first example, and re-imagine your conversation with someone, and it ends well.  Breathe in deeply again and as you exhale, really relax.

Ring your bell or cymbal to denote the beginning of this sharing time.

Allow students to take turns sharing their perspective. Encourage others to listen respectfully and wait their turn to speak.

We’ve designed these first couple of weeks with the program to give teachers insights that will be helpful in lowering student anxiety about being back at school.

For these first few days of school, it may pay off to give kids more time to reply. (This could also lead to more discussion times throughout the day as time or need arises.) 

If you’d like to keep this activity to five minutes, consider coaching students on how to respond quickly yet thoughtfully.

Ring your bell or cymbal to denote the end of this sharing time.

Connecting

This will be a whole class discussion, whether you're in-person or virtual.

We always have to use our judgement (or think about it carefully). There are times when it may not be safe to bring up a problem. The other person might be so mad or upset that you know it won’t turn out well. It might be that it has to do with someone that you don’t know so you can’t gauge whether it is worth bringing up or how they’ll react.

Let’s talk for a moment about what happens when we can’t bring something up… what happens to us? What can we do about it?

Ring your bell or cymbal to denote the beginning of this sharing time.

Allow students to take turns sharing their perspective. Encourage others to listen respectfully and wait their turn to speak.

We’ve designed these first couple of weeks with the program to give teachers insights that will be helpful in lowering student anxiety about being back at school.

For these first few days of school, it may pay off to give kids more time to reply. (This could also lead to more discussion times throughout the day as time or need arises.) 

If you’d like to keep this activity to five minutes, consider coaching students on how to respond quickly yet thoughtfully.

Ring your bell or cymbal to denote the end of this sharing time.

 

Daily Challenge

This allows you to close the discussion on a positive note.

Today notice times when something bothers you and see if you can reflect on it a bit (tune into it… think about it) in the moment and see whether there is a conversation you could have, or whether you have stress you could release.

High Five Finale

This serves as an end-of-day check-in. It's especially effective for younger students.

Who was able to pause when something bothered them today? Did pausing help you decide what to do?

Allow for a popcorn type response if all together. If remote learning, consider a text or quick email to each of your students individually.